Reading Notes

Edward M. Write’s “Using Portfolios” in Assigning, Responding, Evaluating: A Writing Teacher’s Guide

White, Edward M. “Using Portfolios.” Assigning, Responding, Evaluating: A Writing Teacher’s Guide. 4th ed., Bedford/St. Martins, 2007. 

Summary: In this chapter, White provides an extensive overview of portfolios and how to use them. He provides a history of portfolio assessment, explores challenges of a portfolio system and how to respond to these challenges, the content of portfolios–including the reflective cover letter–and how to score/assess the content of portfolios.

Keywords: portfolio, assessment, cover letter, goal statements, holistic scoring

Quotations:

  • “A great advantage of portfolios for writing assessment is that they can include numerous examples of student writing produced over time and under a variety of conditions… / And if one requirement of the portfolio is a self-assessment or reflective essay, students wind up taking responsibility for their own learning” (163-164).
  • “Portfolios appeared to revolve many of the problems that had become evident with essay testing: they validity problem of using only one (or at most two) impromptu writing samples; the absence of opportunities for the writer to reflect and revise; the lack of context or audience for the writing; inappropriate or banal writing problems, and so on” (165).
  • “Portfolios supported teaching . . . portfolios have now achieved standing as the writing assessment method of choice ” (165).
  • “… the portfolio is the only assessment devise that can evaluate a student’s ability to understand revision processes” (171).
  • “A portfolio presented for assessment is essentially a set of evidence for an argument, in the rhetorical sense” (178).
  • “The [portfolio] reader essentially grades the reflective letter, and the portfolio as evidence in that letter, as the portfolio grade” (182).

 

 

 

Advertisements

One thought on “Edward M. Write’s “Using Portfolios” in Assigning, Responding, Evaluating: A Writing Teacher’s Guide

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s